Mother and Son at the Beach
  • Mother and Son at the Beach

    ₪250.00Price

    Vintage Silver Gelatin photograph

     

    13 x 18 cm (size of the photograph)

     

    30 x 40 cm (passepartout size)

     

    The picture is provided with a passepartout but without a frame. If you wish to have a custom made frame feel free to email us.

    • IMPORTANT! WHEN BUYING PHOTOS FROM US:

      - The photographies are sold with a passepartout but without frame.
      - All the photographies are original vintage images.
      - All our press photos are LIMITED ARCHIVE ORIGINALS - they are not reprints or digital prints produced by us.
      - Many times the image for sale will present stamps, dates and other publication details.
      - Since the photos are old photograps they may have scratches, lines or other wears of time, which just underlines the authenticity and age of the photos.
      - What you will buy from us has a true historical value and authenticity.

      - All these old photos have a story to tell and come from reliable sources.

    • SHIPPING & PAYMENT

      SHIPPING:

      After your payment approval, the photography / print will be delivered to you within 5 to 7 days (Israel) and 10 to 15 days (abroad).

      We put the greatest attention on the packaging in order them to get to you in the best conditions.

       

      PAYMENT:

      We accept payment by Credit Cards, Paypal, BIT or Bank Transfer.

    • PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEXT

      By the early 1920s, technology becomes a vehicle of progress and change, and instills hope in many after the devastations of World War I. For avant-garde (“ahead of the crowd”) artists, photography becomes incredibly appealing for its associations with technology, the everyday, and science—precisely the reasons it was denigrated a half-century earlier.

      The camera’s technology of mechanical reproduction made it the fastest, most modern, and arguably, the most relevant form of visual representation in the post-WWI era. Photography, then, seemed to offer more than a new method of image-making—it offered the chance to change paradigms of vision and representation.